User Tools

Site Tools


canino_s_a_mainstay_in_fort_collins_restaurant_scene

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

canino_s_a_mainstay_in_fort_collins_restaurant_scene [2018/04/21 03:28] (current)
Line 1: Line 1:
 +====== Canino'​s A mainstay in Fort Collins'​ restaurant scene ======
  
 +{{ :​bilde.jpg?​nolink|Canino Restaurant}}
 +
 +**Italian restaurant focuses on quality ingredients and recipes handed down through the years.**
 +
 +**Canino’s Restaurant \\
 +• Location: 613 S. College Ave. \\
 +• Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. \\
 +• Menu: 50 lunch and dinner options, including family and children’s meals, pizza and gluten-free pasta \\
 +• Opened in 1976** \\
 +
 +Apr. 30, 2013
 +
 +Written by J. Elizabeth Jones For the Coloradoan.com
 +
 +Clyde Canino is nothing if not consistent.
 +
 +The 60-year-old owner of Canino’s Italian Restaurant has been cooking using the same recipes, the same quality ingredients,​ at the same location, for more than 37 years.
 +
 +And, like the familiar, green awning that welcomes visitors to the restaurant on South College Avenue, a reliable dining experience is expected within.
 +
 +“This isn’t haute cuisine,” Canino said. “That same simple approach we began with has been carried over throughout the years. We use high-quality ingredients and treat them properly.”
 +
 +Canino, who shrugs off the title of chef, said he grew up in the restaurant business, working alongside his father from the age of 12 in the earliest Canino restaurant, a Denver pizzeria that opened in 1957. His grandfather also owned a bakery in North Denver.
 +
 +“None of us were classically trained,” he said, although many of the traditional recipes have origins in Calabria, a region in Southern Italy, where the family has origins. “It’s a farming region, earthy people; the recipes focused on lots of pasta and red sauce.”
 +
 +Canino’s father helped his son get established in Fort Collins. The younger Canino, keen on finding his own way, left Denver in the early 1970s to attend Colorado State University, possibly to become a teacher. But university life wasn’t what he expected.
 +
 +{{:​bilde_1_.jpg?​nolink |Canino Restaurant}}
 +
 +“It was the era of the Vietnam War, the draft; it was really not an academic atmosphere,​” Canino said. “I left school in 1973 and took a job at a restaurant in town — the Out of Bounds — a pretty famous restaurant here in the 1970s and ’80s, a steak and crab house, predominately as a lunch cook.”
 +
 +After a year and a half of “trial by fire,” Canino said, he realized he wanted to accomplish more in the restaurant business. He said his father already had a successful restaurant in town called Tico’s, but that he wasn’t interested in the Mexican food business.
 +
 +“I wanted to go back to Italian food,” Canino said.
 +
 +“I got together with my father again in 1975, and we decided to look for a location here in Fort Collins, and we found this place, and took over their business in December of 1975, and opened up as Canino’s Restaurant on Jan. 14, 1976.”
 +
 +His father and brother worked alongside him in the early years but eventually left him alone at the reins. “My father had his own restaurant, and my brother left to work with him. Too much ego for one location,​” Canino said.
 +
 +Over the years, significant changes have been few at the restaurant.
 +
 +“The menu has certainly evolved from spaghetti, lasagna and ravioli to include veal dishes and seafood,” Canino said, “and I think when compared to other restaurants,​ we have one of the most extensive menus in town.”
 +
 +There are more than 50 lunch options, not including appetizers, and another 50 or so dinner dishes, not including family or children’s meals, or pizza offerings. Gluten-free pasta also is available.
 +
 +With such a wide selection, Canino is reluctant to recommend specific dishes, although he said the Stuffed Jumbo Shells ($16.75, cheese and spinach) Pollo Bruschetta ($18.75, sautéed chicken breast with garlic) and Cioppino ($19.75, seafood and penne) are among the most requested.
 +
 +And then there’s the bread, a soft and chewy cornerstone staple at the restaurant, his grandfather’s recipe, also the crust of Canino’s array of pizzas.
 +
 +“It won an award at the 1936 World’s Fair in St. Louis,” Canino said.
 +
 +For outstanding value, Canino said, Monday and Tuesday nights are popular with students and families. Monday is all-you-can-eat Spaghetti Night ($3.50), and Tuesday is Retro Night, with prices near half those charged for the rest of the week.
 +
 +**CLYDE'​S MANICOTTI**
 +
 +  * 3 pounds of ricotta cheese ​
 +  * 1 egg 
 +  * ½ cup grated Pecorino Romano ​
 +  * 1 lb shredded smokey provolone ​
 +  * 1 box manicotti (angular cut, ribbed, hollow macaroni) ​
 +  * 1 jar of Italian red sauce
 +
 +Cook manicotti according to directions, drain.
 +
 +Blend ricotta, egg, grated romano and shredded provolone. Stuff manicotti with cheese mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with Italian red sauce, and bake at 350 degrees for about 15-20 minutes until pasta is golden brown.
canino_s_a_mainstay_in_fort_collins_restaurant_scene.txt · Last modified: 2018/04/21 03:28 (external edit)