User Tools

Site Tools


30_latin_terms_explained

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Next revision
Previous revision
30_latin_terms_explained [2019/03/24 11:02]
127.0.0.1 external edit
30_latin_terms_explained [2019/11/09 16:43] (current)
admin [Terms starting P – V]
Line 22: Line 22:
 De Facto: De facto is a Latin expression that means “in fact” or “in practice” but not spelled out by law. For example, de facto marriage, or a de facto standard (a standard generally accepted but not formalized). De Facto: De facto is a Latin expression that means “in fact” or “in practice” but not spelled out by law. For example, de facto marriage, or a de facto standard (a standard generally accepted but not formalized).
  
-De Jure: The opposite of de facto.+De Jure: The opposite of de facto. ​Perhaps also "Exo facto"
  
 Dictum: In common law legal terminology a dictum (plural dicta) is any statement that forms a part of the judgment of a court, in particular a court whose decisions have value as precedent. Dictum: In common law legal terminology a dictum (plural dicta) is any statement that forms a part of the judgment of a court, in particular a court whose decisions have value as precedent.
Line 51: Line 51:
  
 Obiter Dictum: “Said by the way”, is a remark or observation made by a judge that, although included in the body of the court’s opinion, does not form a necessary part of the court’s decision. Obiter Dictum: “Said by the way”, is a remark or observation made by a judge that, although included in the body of the court’s opinion, does not form a necessary part of the court’s decision.
 +
 +In situ: I have also seen In situ being used when asking if an object required disassembly prior to pick up or if the owner had already dismantled the object such as stair case or a fence. The term translates literally to "on site" or "in position."​ It can mean "​locally",​ "on site", "on the premises",​ or "in place" to describe where an event takes place and is used in many different contexts.
  
 ====== Terms starting P – V ====== ====== Terms starting P – V ======
Line 71: Line 73:
  
 Vice Versa: “The other way around.” Vice is most commonly pronounced with one syllable, but in Classical Latin it is pronounced “Wee-kay wehr-suh” and in Ecclesiastical Latin “Vee-chay vehr-suh”. Vice Versa: “The other way around.” Vice is most commonly pronounced with one syllable, but in Classical Latin it is pronounced “Wee-kay wehr-suh” and in Ecclesiastical Latin “Vee-chay vehr-suh”.
 +
 +Persona Non Gratia, also have heard "​persona non gratia"​ being used and its definition is "​person not welcome",​ it was used to appear absolute and serious in the rejection of a person who has had their access revoked due to behaviour infridgements.
30_latin_terms_explained.1553385758.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/03/24 11:02 by 127.0.0.1